Gout and Arthritis Treatment

Gout diet Do's  and  Don'ts

What is gout?

Gout is a kind of arthritis. It can cause an attack of sudden burning pain, stiffness, and swelling in a joint, usually a big toe. These attacks can happen over and over unless gout is treated. Over time, they can harm your joints, tendons, and other tissues. Gout is most common in men.

What causes gout?

Gout is caused by too much uric acid in the blood. Most of the time, having too much uric acid isn't harmful. Many people with high levels in their blood never get gout. But when uric acid levels in your blood are too high, the uric acid may form hard crystals in your joints.

Your chances of getting gout are higher if you are overweight, drink too much alcohol, or eat too much meat and fish that are high in chemicals called purines. Some medicines, such as water pills (diuretics), can also bring on gout.

What are the symptoms?



The most common sign of gout is a nighttime attack of swelling, tenderness, redness, and sharp pain in your big toe . You can also get gout attacks in your foot, ankle, or knees, or other joints. The attacks can last a few days or many weeks before the pain goes away. Another attack may not happen for months or years.

See your doctor even if your pain from gout is gone. The buildup of uric acid that led to your gout attack can still harm your joints.

How is gout diagnosed?

Your doctor will ask questions about your symptoms and do a physical exam. Your doctor may also take a sample of fluid from your joint to look for uric acid crystals. This is the best way to test for gout. Your doctor may also do a blood test to measure the amount of uric acid in your blood.

How is it treated?

To stop a gout attack, your doctor can give you a shot of corticosteroids or prescribe a large daily dose of one or more medicines. The doses will get smaller as your symptoms go away. Relief from a gout attack often begins within 24 hours if you start treatment right away.

To ease the pain during a gout attack, rest the joint that hurts. Taking ibuprofen or another anti-inflammatory medicine can also help you feel better. But don't take aspirin. It can make gout worse by raising the uric acid level in the blood.

To prevent future attacks, your doctor can prescribe a medicine to reduce uric acid buildup in your blood.

Paying attention to what you eat may help you manage your gout. Eat moderate amounts of a healthy mix of foods to control your weight and get the nutrients you need. Limit daily intake of meat, seafood, and alcohol (especially beer). Drink plenty of water and other fluids

Moringa Olefeira as Treatment for Gout and Arthritis

In 2008 the Faculty of Medicine Health Sciences of the Putra University in Malaysia, published a research aimed to test if Moringa poses any Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory activities, the same activities achieved by the drugs used in modern medicine such as NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). The research found that the Moringa leaves posses substances that have antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activitie; in fact they found that it has high quantities of these substances. This means that Moringa Oleifera use in Indian traditional medicine as a treatment Arthritis and Gout was just.

The effects of the Moringa is suppressing the COX-2 enzyme. This enzyme is responsible for inflammation processes and pain. Usually the drugs used to suppress this enzyme are NSAID such as Voltaren, Nksin, Adoil, ARCOXIA, Kaspo etc. The side effects of these products include
risk for stroke, kidney problems, blood vessels problems, stomach problems and the list goes on. Combine the risks from the side effects with the existing condition causing the need to take the NSAID and the presence of pain combined with an inflammatory issue, and the risks for medical complications grow. Moringa Oleifera in pure natural tree that has been used as food and as medicine along history, this means that it is much safer to use than NSAID but with similar effectiveness and less toxicity


Reference:
Gout, Causes, Symptoms and  Treatments http://www.webmd.com/arthritis/tc/gout-topic-overview#2

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